How These Teenage Sisters Reinvented Makeup For The Millennial Minimalist

How These Teenage Sisters

Reinvented Makeup For The Millennial Minimalist

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Ally and Taylor Frankel’s brand Nudestix has taken the beauty market to task in the past year with its minimalist beauty aesthetic and easy application. The indie sensation has become a hit with the millennial generation rising up against make-up heavy faces and SWAAY talked to Taylor about leading the way forward with their minimalist movement.

“We do not aspire to look perfect and flawless – we just want to look like ourselves – but also, we just want something quick and easy, and to embrace our natural beauty”

The girls’ mom left her high profile job back in 2011 so she could devote more time to her children’s upbringing – an Eat, Pray, Love moment Taylor calls it, and with that she had more time to spend watching the girls, listening and observing their habits. Before long, the girls and their morning routine would come to resemble a family business opportunity the likes of which the billion dollar cosmetics industry has never seen.

In an era of youtubers and make-up tutorials, the girls made a break from the discerningly heavy and obvious make-up trends of old and saw a white space in the market for a more minimal, toned down look. Instead of trying to emulate beauty bloggers and celebrities, Ally and Taylor encourage you to look like yourself. And they’re now attributed to one of the biggest trends of late – the stick and its multi-form, multi-use, hassle-free application.

The girls “multitasking lives” demanded a product that merely accentuated their best features rather than sculpting their entire face. There simply wasn’t the time anymore for something extraneous. They aren’t #MUAs nor do they profess to be; they’re the everygirl, working to produce a line for girls like them to use quickly and efficiently everyday – and the stick form does this. Neutral shades are the girls go to and the sticks can thus become multipurpose – for your eye, lip and cheek.

“We’re not make-up artists”

“The beauty industry talks a lot about perfection, flawlessness and make up artistry, ‘full face’ – and it totally turned us off”

Enter Nudestix – the make up brand for the millennial minimalist.

Sisters Ally(17) and Taylor(20) represent a youthful ignorance toward the by-gone age of Sex in the City whereby their mother and her peers would  lather on make up and pour over their imperfections for superfluous amounts of time with brushes and creams before deeming themselves ready for the day ahead. Their Nudestix campaign ‘Go Nude but Luminous’ attests to a generation who care about their appearance but refuse to spend the amount of hours previous generations have spent layering on le macquiallage. “It was about enhancing what we already had” says Taylor. Having become a bit peeved at how the cosmetic industry was talking to women – instructing them on the heavy amounts of make-up it’s deemed necessary to wear in our airbrushed world – the girls and their mother decided a neutral and minimalist approach was the future. “Even though there were all these beauty products out there,” Taylor remonstrates, “they weren’t talking to us about beauty the way we wanted to be talked to.”

Their mother, Jenny Frankel, was mixer and make-up extraordinaire(the woman who brought you M.A.C’s lipglass) before taking time off from her prolific career in cosmetics to focus on her daughters’ upbringing – “our mom has been in the beauty industry for twenty years,” Taylor laughs, “she co-created her own beauty brand while my sister and I were both in diapers.” And so the story goes that when the girls grew up and start acquiring their own sense of style and makeup routines, Jenny recognized the difference in her daughters’ routine versus her own, and saw an opening in the market for the busy millennials, and thereafter, Nudestix was found.

The girls and their mother have worked tirelessly to produce products that represent a new age of Make-up and a new trend that has very quickly caught on. It has become a niche in a market that almost demands superfluity – purple eyeshadows; sculpted faces; burlesque lips. “We like to think about make-up in a way a lot of people aren’t talking about it,” Taylor posits – “which is, you don’t need to wear a full face. You can wear a little bit in strategic places to accentuate your features.”

We’re your everyday girls – we’re students, we’re working”

Having rose quickly to fame because of their appearance on QVC, where they were allowed the run of the show – from curating to producing, you can now find the product pretty much everywhere – most notably on the shelves in Sephora. The brand ‘for millennials, by millennials’ is seriously hot stuff and was included in my round-up email last week from the make-up retailer. The girls have certainly started a trend, with many other makeup lines now adding multi-use pencils to their product lists.

“It’s a trend now which is awesome,” Taylor recognizes in her competition, “but for us, it was really about creating a product that was multi-use.” The simplification of the beauty process and the accentuation of natural beauty having been their aim from the beginning its only natural that the brand has become such a success. We recently got to try the matte lip pencil and the highlighter, and as busy women constantly running around the city – these pencils are the very best product for the woman with little to no time. If these teens don’t scream aspirational goals – I don’t know who does.

“We want people to be able to say – these girls, they’re your girls next door, if they can do it, so can we”

Amy Corcoran

The Associate Editor of SWAAY: Amy is an Irish writer, avid foodie and feminist with an insatiable appetite for novels and empowering women's writing. She has enjoyed calling Dublin, Paris and now New York her home.

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