6 Brands Championing Diversity and Inclusion Through Company Culture

6 Brands Championing Diversity And Inclusion

Through Company Culture

(Cover photo courtesy of Nike)

Shares

Whether you’re a man, woman, black, white, asian, gay, straight, transgender, disabled, unusual – you have probably experienced varying levels of discrimination throughout your life, and more specifically, in the workplace.

Needless to say, there are some jobs, some industries out there that just aren’t inclusive – whether it’s their hiring standards, product development, or their advertizing, many people can find themselves alienated by certain brands because of who their target audience is and consequently who their target workforce is. It’s natural in life to feel left out – to know a product isn’t meant or designed for you, but to feel aggrieved nonetheless.

However, there are also those times when brands, or indeed entire industries have made egregious errors in judgement by excluding, deluding or discriminating against specific sections of the society. These companies below represent a core group that are focused on diversity and inclusion across the board and have gone out of their way to make sure nobody is left behind.

1

Target

Target’s multicultural business empire and attitude is widely recognized and easily recognized in every one of its stores. Diversity Inc had Target positioned at number 22 on its top 50 most diverse firms for reasons such as its willingness to promote Latinos at a much higher level than even those in the top 10 rankings. In terms of product – Target has never shied away from stocking brands that also celebrate and highlight diversity. It’s a retailer that has consistently – through advertisements, merchandising and employment, continues to prove its ability to diversify.

Their hiring pledge is one you don’t see on many company websites, and consequently, one worth mentioning: 

“We believe diversity and inclusivity make teams and Target better. And we’ll live that belief as champions of a more inclusive society by creating a diverse and inclusive work environment, cultivating an inclusive guest experience, and fostering equality in society.” – Target

2

Nike

Product development and innovation have run Nike for the past fifty years. Having branded themselves the frontrunners in new sports’ produce and discoveries, with the latest addition to their lines, they are certainly surpassing expectations.

This week saw the release of test shots for their new ‘Pro Hijab’ for Muslim women – a contentious and hotly-anticipated product, but one that Nike drove relentlessly to get into production. Brand ambassadors for the Hijab include figure skater Zahra Lari and triathlete Manal Rostom. The product comes after an explosion of spending in the Middle-East caused a shift in marketing strategies and advertisement spending by international brands. 

The wealth of the region can no longer be ignored and neither can the consumer base. The ‘Pro Hijab’ is the first of many products I would imagine that will target this specific area for its wealth of resources and diverse culture.

3

Starbucks

Starbucks CEO caused ructions in the wake of Trump’s immigration enforcement on Muslim- majority countries, after he pledged to hire ’10,000 refugees’ to the dismay and furore of much of the president’s supporters. The announcement that came on January 29th aims to extend a hadn’t to those displaced throughout the world in Starbucks locations from all 75 countries they operate in.

The pledge, and its meaning however are not revolutionary within the company. Starbucks hiring policies are perhaps some of the most inclusive and broad in the U.S. They continue to strive to hire as many veterans as they can, while also having a stellar reputation for hiring those with disabilities.

Executives from the company were also among those last year who came out vociferously against a radical anti-LGBTQ bill in North Carolina.

4

Lush Cosmetics

Lush received a huge wave of support in recent weeks for their Valentines Day ad-campaign which featured two gay couples taking bubble baths. The normalization and ease with which the couples mesh into the ad is perhaps the reason its garnered so very much support. LGBTQ communities have been angered previously by ‘token’ inclusion of the LGBTQ community in ads. However, the couples featured in the Valentines campaign are not only integral to the reel but made up some of the funnest and most wholesome moments, and refute any ‘tokenistic’ sentiment.  

Photo: Lush Cosmetics

5

Cover Girl

The iconic brand hired its first ‘Coverboy’ at the end of last year when James Charles, make-up artist extraordinaire headlined their lash equality campaign.

It wasn’t just Charles however who caused a bit of a rouse in the campaign. A model wearing a hijab is also featured – highlighting again the need for further Muslim representation in ads like these. For too long the growing chunk of the beauty market being consumed by Muslim women and women in the middle-east as a whole has been ignored and its only in recent months that we are beginning to see western advertizing move on this front.

Photo: CNN

6

Ben & Jerry’s

It’s only in the last few years that social media has become a marketing force to be reckoned with, contending heavily with TV advertisements and  direct marketing. Building a brand now relies on what you’re tweeting, who you’re retweeting, what your Instagram looks like and if your Facebook is allowed to remain idle for more than a week.

The Black Lives Matter Campaign was left very much out in the wind by brands across the board, whether it was to remain apolitical or because it was they were too lazy, very, very few brands get involved and needless to say it didn’t go unnoticed.

The eponymous ice-cream giant Ben & Jerry’s however refused to remain silent and tweeted about the lack of response from their fellow retailers. The politically active brand does not typically shy away from controversial social issues.

The tweet resounded heavily with a community that felt particularly aggrieved by the lack of movement from brands who are quick to get involved in other political movements – take for example the huge response from those that are currently dropping Ivanka Trump’s clothing lines. Had the Black Lives Matter movement received as much attention as the #grabyourwallet campaign perhaps we’d be looking at a different political climate currently. For the most part part unfortunately it remained in the back seat in relation to other perhaps less important issues.

Amy Corcoran

Amy is an Irish writer, avid foodie and feminist with an insatiable appetite for novels and empowering women's writing. She has enjoyed calling Dublin, Paris and now New York her home.

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Listen To Our Podcast

FOLLOW US ON

© Copyright SWAAY Media 2017. All Rights Reserved.
Instagram

instagram