I Was Told I Was Too Opinionated For Cable TV

I Was Told I Was Too Opinionated For Cable TV

Eboni Williams, 34

Fox News Host and Author 

Unafraid to unabashedly share her opinion on the airwaves, Fox News Host, Eboni Williams, is certainly a woman to watch. Raised by a single mom in Charlotte, Williams faced a litany of obstacles throughout her career, not least that she was a strong, opinionated black woman, attributes which she says were hurled her way as derogatory. ”Society might have its rules and expectations of you, reject them at every turn and insist upon your own exceptionalism,” she says.

This exceptionalism has lead to her hosting her own radio show, releasing her book PRETTY POWERFUL: Appearance, Substance & Success and contributing her inspiring message to the world.

1. What made you choose this career path? What has been your greatest achievement?

Since I was a child I had a loud voice and strong opinion, so I thought it best to put it to productive use. As a litigator, multimedia host and now as an author, I’m privileged to lend my voice to the voiceless and otherwise empower women, men and children who otherwise might not be heard.

My greatest achievement has been hosting a show on the #1 cable news network while hosting a talk radio show and releasing a bestselling book at the same time. I never considered myself a multi-tasker, but I became one in 2017

2. What’s the biggest criticism/stereotype/judgement you’ve faced in your career?

As I write in the ‘Mean Girls’ chapter of my book, I was told I was too young, too strong in my opinion and black…all reasons I wouldn’t be able to be hired by Fox News or able to host a show. All proved ignorantly wrong. 

All throughout my life false narratives of society and media said as an only child to a single, high school educated mom, I would repeat her pattern of a struggling single black mom. She made sure I didn’t and we worked to reject that stereotypical noise at every turn. 

3. How did you #SWAAYthenarrative? What was the reaction by those who told you you “couldn’t” do it?

Shirley Chisholm is an iconic role model of mine. She was the first black woman to serve in the US congress and she said if they don’t invite you to the table, bring your own chair and pull up a seat. I LOVE bringing my own chair and crashing the party. 

4. What did you learn through your personal journey?

I SWAAYed the narrative by having key individuals (a strong mom, teachers, community members) that nourished my talent and told me I could do ANYTHING I worked for. I was never talked to about glass ceilings or limitations…only personal ambition. Narratives are all about social norms and “rules.” In a world of other people’s “rules” I’ve always elected to be my own exception. 

5. What’s your number one piece of advice to women discouraged by preconceived notions and society’s limitations?

Bet on yourself. Don’t concern yourself with a million “no’s” only focus on the one “YES” that you need. Society might have its rules and expectations of you, reject them at every turn and insist upon your own exceptionalism.  

Team STN

The backbone of our campaign

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Listen To Our Podcast


© Copyright SWAAY Media 2017. All Rights Reserved.
Sign up for our NewsLetter