10 1970s Interviewing Tips That Work in 2018

10 1970s Interviewing Tips

That Will Help You Find A Job in 2018

Photo Courtesy of Cheat Sheet

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We’re sure you’ve all heard stories of how hard it was in “the olden days” to do a variety of things we do today with the push of a button, or maybe you’ve heard about how someone walked five miles in the snow to go to school. You needn’t journey back that far to imagine the pure nightmare it would be for you without your cell phone, internet or GPS. For those of you who grew up with these gems of technology, these tools are as ordinary as bottled water. But for those of us growing up in the 60s and 70s, before they were commonplace, we never felt the lack of something we never knew.

Let’s journey back a little to the 1970’s and take a glimpse at life without these tools. To make it more fun, how about doing some job-hunting?  I’ve been through this process both in the 70’s and currently, and I couldn’t be more appreciative of how much easier the process is now.

1. You wake up and immediately scan LinkedIn or Indeed.com to see what’s available, right? Uh-uh! You’ve no internet, so you must get dressed and go pick up an actual newspaper to check out the “want ads.”

Remember, even before the advent of the internet, networking was always important when job hunting. If you know it will be kept confidential, let your friends and business associates know you’re looking. Most of the jobs I landed were actually through referrals from former bosses, co-workers or friends who had moved on to other companies. It’s a lot easier now to contact those sources by email or text than when I had to play telephone tag before I reached them!

2. After identifying some prospects, you write a quick cover letter with a resume and email it to your prospects. No, No! Without email, you’ll manually type a cover letter and prepare a resume. No computers yet.

Ugh, I remember when I had to do this. You might type your resume and then realize you wanted to change or reorder part of it, or maybe you wanted to experiment with different fonts (yes, Selectric typewriters had a changeable typeface). There was no cutting and pasting or selecting and changing. You had to start all over again. Then we had to take a perfect original and have it photocopied. You protected that original as though it were a world-changing document. Now you may go to the printer and have them run off some copies right from your phone. Also, if your job entails a portfolio, you can have it shown right from your iPad instead of carrying around a large, difficult-to-carry presentation.

3. Now, you’ll either hand deliver or mail the hard copies. You may prefer hand delivery to insure they’ll arrive more quickly.

4. For the next few days, you wait at home for a response, because without a cell phone you can’t be reached if you’re out and voice mail is still waiting to be invented.

That was terribly inconvenient, but unless you had a telephone sitter at home while you did some errands, you might miss that call.

5. One of your prospects finally calls to set up an interview. You usually Google the prospective employer so you’ll have some input during the interview. Without the internet, you’ll have to go to the library and use their reference books or buy some business magazines.

I still believe it’s important to know as much as you can about a company before an interview. Besides helping you to ask the right questions, you might find something that makes you change your mind about pursuing this job. Remember, they need your approval as much as you need theirs!

Photo by REX, courtesy of Marie Claire

6. The day of the interview arrives, and you’re eager to create a good impression, so you head out early to make sure you have no trouble finding the office. Uh! Oh! No GPS. You’ll have to get a paper map. Maybe you can find a gas station that carries them.

Since I worked in New York City for most of my career, it was always finding the quickest mass transit route to take. Sometimes, I would make a dry run before the interview day just to see how long it would take. Besides the GPS, you now get this information right online, both the route and the average time it will take, whether by car or public transit.

7. Now you‘re on your way, armed with a genuine paper map, and you find yourself in a huge traffic jam. You’ll just call your interviewer’s office and explain, but there’s no cell phone, so you search frantically for a pay telephone. None in sight. After all, you’re on a busy highway. Then it starts to rain, and you realize you should have waited for the weather forecast at the end of the news. No, there’s no weather app to scroll.

Besides no weather app, there was no cable, thus no weather channel, so the weather was always at the end of the news. Who had time to wait for that when you’re getting ready for an interview?

Photo courtesy of Elle

8. An hour late, you reach your destination, a bit disheveled from the stress of it all and quite soaking wet from walking from the parking lot with no umbrella or raincoat.

You probably should still come prepared for the unexpected by throwing a few extras in your bag: i.e., umbrella, extra copies of your resume, etc.

9. It’s difficult to stay confident and positive when you look like a drowned rat, but you do your best to ace the interview and just hope for the best. Despite the anxiety-ridden start, the interview does go well, and you’re told you will be called in a few days.

I want to highlight something that was better in the “olden days.” After interviews, the company always contacted you, either by mail or phone, to say whether you got the job, or they hired someone else. If you’re a writer, you may spend your weekend doing a week’s worth of articles and edits as part of the interview process, or you might go on 5 interviews with one company, and they don’t get back to you either way! I remember just such a time, I had at least 5 interviews with the same company, and on the fifth one, when I stopped at the security desk for a pass, the guard recognized me but thought I worked there and just forgot my pass. That company never got back to me, and when I called for the status, they always said they had made no decisions yet. So maybe, that’s the one facet of job-searching we wish would have remained in place.

10. Again, you wait for a call and even answer the phone with your normal voice whenever it rings.

This is opposed to the fake accent I used when I wasn’t expecting any calls and didn’t know who was calling. Without caller ID, you didn’t want to take any chance of being trapped by a salesperson or someone else with whom you have no interest in talking.

Halleluiah, you got the job! Now come back to the current world and use all your tech tools, because you have been hired as a marketing director, and we won’t even scare you with how you would have to do this job without them!

Carol Zyla

Carol Zyla is an ageless, fun-loving single woman in love with New York City, nature, Tennessee Williams, and still crushing on Elvis.

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